spicing it up: critique strategies

Posted by on Jan 29, 2012 in blog, teaching | 2 Comments

The topic of critique strategies is certainly something that art & design educators struggle with. To this end, we hosted a FATE critique workshop here at SHSU this weekend. There were some fantastic ideas demonstrated by Chris Ireland and Valerie Powell, as well as great discussion generated by Kansas State Faculty Shreepad Joglekar, Erin Wiersma, and Mike McMann.

One theme that seemed to emerge from the workshop is the challenge of getting students involved in critical discussion of semantics early on, specifically during foundational courses. One of Chris’ examples required that students develop a narrative for unfamiliar photographs. The playful nature of this challenge covertly demands evaluation of what imagery means. Students identify symbols within the photos and weave their meaning into their stories. I would expect that students would draw from personal experiences and prejudices, which could offer great opportunities for discussion.

There were parallels with the performance aspect of some of Valerie’s projects. While the wearable cardboard assignment addresses formal principles such as space and form, the requirement that the projects be worn and performed in character adds the aspect of time; pacing and motion are integral aspects of the artwork.

Why not introduce these challenges within foundations assignments, especially considering many of these students will probably choose majors that will utilize time and motion.

Chris Ireland at the spicing it up: critique strategies workshop at shsu.

Erin Wiersma at the spicing it up: critique strategies workshop at shsu.

2 Comments

  1. Scott Seaboldt
    20121010

    Just throwing out a line as I am slated to be on this FATE panel in the spring @ SCAD.

    I am working up the paper for the conference and wonder if readers are out there.

    I am a newbie to presenting at conferences.

    thanks

    Scott

  2. ceo
    20121011

    What’s the presentation about?

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